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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 161 (some duplicates have been removed)
not realize this huge trade deficit we have. half of it historical has been energy products, mostly oil. if you get to the point where you are a self-sufficient producer -- i am glad you said north american energy independent. i always disliked the idea of this national energy independence. if you become energy self- sufficient, you eliminate half the trade deficit. this really changes the balance of payments and the overall shape and direction of the economy. could you speak to that? >> i for started talking about it two years ago. -- i first started talking about it two years ago. i started talking about what was possible with oil. i was a lone wolf in the woods at the time. since then, the bandwagon has loaded up. a lot of other people are saying, yes, it could happen, and it to be very important for america. particularly as it translates from energy to the general economy. there are more pillars' out there, housing, manufacturing -- they depend on recovery. the one that does not is energy, because the international demand is already there. it has been created by china, india. all ar
by the party opposite that energy companies will have to put people on the lowest tariffs. that is a record we can be proud of. >> steve basic. >> mr. speaker -- [inaudible] my constituency is enb during a hideous regulatory fast thanks to the health and safety executive and the european union. the british economy is very reliant on smallnd medium businesses far less able to cope with bad regulation particularly when it's badly administer inside the u.k. >> my honorable friend is absolutely right. businesses large andsml are complaining about the burden of regulation. not just the burden of regular ration from europe -- regulation from europe, but more generally. and that ishy we should be fighting in europe for a more flexible europe and a europe where we see regulations come off. but the view of the party opposite is sit back, do nothing and never listen to the british >> you have been watching prime minister's questions from the british house of commons. watch any time at c-span.org, where you can find video asked by ministers questions and other are just public affairs programs. >> this ev
people out of unemployment, and bring a renewed energy to our country. coming up, will the debt ceiling debate delay your tax refund? next in the president obama has begun his second term by declaring the possibilities are limitless. our political panel takes a look at the next four years. ♪ >>> from our fox business studios in new york, here, again, is gerri willis. gerri: well, not wasting a second of the second term, president obama making it clear who is in charge the next four years laying out a bold agenda in the inaugural address. that's how i read it. with more, maryann marsh, a democratic strategist, and rich lawry, editor of "the national review. " what do you think of the speech? >> audacious. one, it was an unabashedly progressive speech, shorn of the pose that's characterized as rhetoric. it also, i think, was audacious in its appropriation of the tradition of the american foundings. it was a direct challenge to republicans and the tea party saying you are obsessed with the founders. you are wrong. i am the one firmly within the tradition, and you are outside the mainstre
a renewed energy to our country. coming up, will the debt ceiling debate delay your tax refund? next in the president obama has begun his second term by declaring the possibilities are limitless. our political panel takes a look at the next four years. ♪ officemax can help you drive supply costs down... and down. use your maxperks card and get a 10-ream case of officemax multiuse paper for just 4.99 after maxperks rewards. find thousands of big deals now... at officemax. - ♪ 'cause people got me questioning ♪ ♪ where is the love - ma'am. you forgot your purse. - thank you. oh. thank you very much. - a message from the foundation for a beer life. >>> from our fox business stios in new york, here, again, is gerri willis. gerri: well, not wasting a second of the second term, president obama making it clear who is in charge the next four years laying out a bold agenda in the inaugural address. that's how i read it. with more, maryann marsh, a democratic strategist, and rich lawry, editor of "the national review. " whato you think of the speech? >> audacious. one, it was an unabas
, money, energy, and one of the things that made this campaign unique was the degree of investment and ownership people had in this common object of hours. you understood this was not just about the candidate. not just about joe biden or barack obama. this was about us. who we are as a nation. what values we cherish. how hard we are willing to fight to make sure those values live, not just for today, but for future generations. all of you here understood and were committed to the basic notion that, when we put our shoulders to the wheel of history, it moves. it moves forward. that is part of what we celebrate when we come together for inauguration. yesterday americans in all 50 states took part in a national day of service. tomorrow, hundreds of thousands will join us in the national mall. what the inauguration reminds us of is the role we have as fellow citizens. the sense that there is something larger than ourselves. that gives shape and meaning to our lives. the theme of this years inauguration is our people and our future. throughout my career, that has always given me energy
, every suburb. people who have invested so much heart and soul and time, money, energy. you know, one of the things tha energy. one of the things that made this unique is the people that had the investment in this. you understood it was not just about a candidate. it was not just about joe biden or barack obama. this was about us, who we are as a nation, what values we cherish, how hard we're willing to fight to make sure those values live not just for today but for future generations. all of you here understood and were committed to the basic notion that when we put our shoulders to the wheel of history it moves. it moves. it moves forward. that's part of what we celebrate when we come together for inauguration. yesterday americans in all 50 states took part in a national day of service. tomorrow hundreds of thousands will join us in the national mall. what the inauguration reminds us of is the role we have as fellow citizens in promoting a common good even as we carry out our individual responsibilities. the sense there's something larger than ourselves that give shape and meaning t
with the energy -- and help something like 80,000 houses a year, this new plan could help up to 230 thousand houses. that is what we are doing. it is a record we should be proud of. >> 90 mr. speaker. and prime minister should know that the os of recently released figures, 24,000 cold- weather deaths, the majority of those who perished were over the age of 75. does he think his government should do more to help the elderly and vulnerable and less to help millionaires with tax cut question mark >> we are doing more to help the elderly. a record increase in the basic state pension. bigger than what the party opposite would have done with their roles. keeping the cold weather payments at the higher level. the last rt only introduced before the election. keeping our promise. taking all of those steps and making sure that energy companies will have to put people on the lowest. that is a record we should be proud of. >> my constituency is enduring something hideous. thanks to the european union. with my right honorable friend remind us that the british economy -- businesses far less able to cope w
and more powerful storms. the path toward sustainable energy sources will belong and sometimes difficult. but america cannot resist this transition. we must leave it. we cannot cede this, must climates prague -- its promise. that is how we will maintain our economic vitality and our national parks, forests, waterways, snowcapped peaks. that is how we will preserve our planet, commanded to our care. that is what will lend meaning to the creek our fathers once declared. >> there was a lot of time spent on climate change. was that a surprise? guest: i think people expected climate change to get a shout out along with immigration, gun control the environment of trinity was really been very surprised challenge mentioning god. it got a huge and a huge chunk of time, almost more than any other policy issues. that was a real surprise. host: it was an issue we did not hear a lot about on the campaign .rail paria guest: that was by design. his advisers have made it clear that they did not see that as winning -- as a winning campaign issue. although it is something the president did care about, it
, energy and we want to be sure in the country these debates are not quiet debates in rooms in washington, exclusively. that there are people out there in the country pushing for action. >> chris: when the president talks in that clip about the republicans have suspicions about social security. suspicions about feeding poor kids, that is not true. >> listen, chris -- >> they have different ideas about how to save social security. not suspicions about social security. >> well, i think again, where common ground does exist on the need to reduce the deficit in a balanced way that will help the economy grow, amongst democrats on the hill, and, a few republicans, the barrier to progress here is not the president. we need to see more republicans and congress -- in congress willing to compromise, even on revenues. >> chris: they say they need to see the president willing to compromise on spending cuts and entitlement reform. >> let's look at what we offered speaker boehner. it is public. $400 billion in health care savings we offered, and $200 billion of additional cuts in domestic spending and
of the denying quorum and in the case of speaking as long as you cou could, you had to spend time and energy, you had to organize and it was visible before this body. it was visible before the reporters gathered in the balcony. therefore, the american people, long before there was a television camera here, could see what you were doing and the public could provide feedback on that. but now we come to the modern era. from 1970 forward. in which it became popular to start using the objection as an instrument of party warfare, the objection to a final vote. you know, if we turn back before 1970, you had an overlap of the parties of perhaps 30 members. and so if one had used his objection, they'd have a good sense that you would be able to get cloture. furthermore, there was a social contract that you only interrupted the workings of this body on an issue of deep principle. you only blockaded the operations of the senate on an issue of profound concern to your state. not as a routine instrument of party politics. but that's changed over the last 45 years, since 1970 forward, the last 43 years, in whi
. and more powerful storms. the path toward sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult. but america cannot resist this transition. we must lead it. >> you'll recall with the exception of a single line in his dnc speech, our current state of climate peril was barely mentioned in the campaign. in fact, it was the first time in 24 years it was never raised at any of the debates. so, i was not the only commentator who was surprised to find such a passionate, lengthy passage in his speech. a speech, of course, is just that. often we have a tendency to overestimate just how much presidential rhetoric can accomplish. right after the speech the new york times ran an article with the headline, speech gives climate goal center stage. president obama masetting in motion what democrats say will be a deliberate pace, aggressive campaign built around use of executive powers to sidestep congressional opposition. libertarian author gene healey coined it cult of the, a quasi figure, directing the nation's attention and resources at a whim. and in the sphere of national security that is
during this time because america is moving towards energy independence, some of the idea that we need to press ahead with this. but actually wright now there's capital investments in all of the refineries. if we don't you know put in sensible environmental policies while we're doing this massive energy extraction, we're not -- chris: tack tracking in or out is it going to last? >> it's going to last. >> the tea senator from texas look for him to make noise around the haguel nominations. he's on the senate armed services committee. he's been to scrawl twice in the last month -- israel twice in the last months. he's a star among the tea party crowd. people are talking about him. i have a possible 2016 contender. the problem being he was born in canada. >> the cliche that young people are liberal and ultra conservative is wrong. but it is true now. and that highlights the challenge. what they need to do is figure out a way to go make a kind of small government market economy-based case to young people, without turning them off. chris: could the cheap investment be a younger candidate lik
congress. take the movement energy into those stairs -- spheres with the ideas matter of the heart of occupy. >> winter is coming. cities like san francisco and oakland and other cities are closing down the encampments and chasing people off. you can drive 90 miles from davis and pepper spray. it is hard to maintain people's attention for long periods of time. i am wondering -- should they be occupying the supreme court? [applause] >> i was talking about that today. with all respect for putting your body on the line which captivated the imagination in the beginning, it now needs to be less about states and place -- spaces and places and more about going to wear in justice -- injustice is. there are plans to occupy the supreme court from the second anniversary of the citizens united decision. that crazy decision has given the rights to corporations to unleash their treasuries into our already polluted political system. go there. go to your local congresspersons office. go to banks charging student loans up the highest rates. go to those places. i think we will see more of that. occu
the same spot as last time! the atmosphere, the energy here is electric. [ laughter ] we can move closer. we can walk closer than this. let's just walk. okay. so it was off to a slow start. we have have the right day today, right? this is it? we can pick it up. we can really move. i was expecting a few more people than this. >> just wait around. you'll see. they coming. >> this feels a bit more like an ultimate frisbee signup. this is nice. >> slightly less people than in 2009 but they more than made up for it with enthusiasm. how excited are you to be here? >> i'm tired. >> yay! >> yay! >> yay! >> last time it felt like an historic event. this one feels more like a constitutionally mandated process. >> ah, i would say so. >> what was wrong with these people? 2009 they understood the scale of what is happening. >> for me it's the most historic event that is happening. >> number one. >> number one in terms of history of the world. it's better than the moon landing, way better than the moon landing. >> how is it possible that weapon went from that to the 45th shuttle run in just four years
suburb. people who have invested so much heart and soul and time, money, energy. you know, one of the things that made this campaign unique was all of you here understood and were committed to the basic notion that when we put our shoulders to the wheel of history, it moves. it moves. it moves forward. [ applause ] and that's part of what we celebrate when we come together for inauguration. you know, yesterday americans in all 50 states took part in a national day of service. tomorrow, hundreds of thousands will join us in the national mall. and what the inauguration reminds us of is the role we have as fellow citizens in promoting a common good. even as we carry out our individual responsibilities. the sense there's something larger than ourselves that gives shape and meaning to our lives. the theme of this year's inauguration is our people and our future. throughout my career what's always given me energy and inspiration and hope, what's allowed me to stand up when i've been knocked down are folks like you. the decency, the goodness, the resilience, the neighborliness. the pa
the energy and creativity and passion into projecting his ideas that he did put in the first couple of years into trying to compromise with people who were not having it. i'm very optimistic. >> i think we're part of making the case, not just part of people in the administration, or whatever. but people who believe in progressive action. david, how do we make the case in the time of a $16 trillion debt, and i know we have to get around this, that we could have a capital budget. we could raise money and spend it in a way that would increase the wealth of this country because of infrastructure and allowing us to have the transportation that is equal to that in europe today, western europe and in asia. can we make that case, or are we stuck with this big debt, therefore all we talk about is retrenchment? >> well, you have to make the case that in this hyper competitive global economy that we now live in, we can't afford to let hurry infrastructure either go to waste or not keep up with what is happening in other countries. he made that argument today, the president, in terms of sustainable ener
. throughout my career what's always given me energy and inspiration and hope, what's allowed me to stand up when i've been knocked down are folks like you. the decency, the goodness, the resilience, the neighborliness. the patriotism. the sense of duty. the sense of responsibility of the american people. you have inspired me throughout. and so, whenever i think about the challenges that joe and i and jill and michelle face, we know that we stand amongst friends and colleagues and fellow citizens. and that the work is not just ours that we are working together. so, i just want to say thank you. thank you very much. thank you. and i want all of you to know that even as we celebrate over the next couple of days, and feel free to stay up as late as you want, tomorrow's not a school night. make sure to bundle up although it won't be as cold as it was four years ago. make sure you know that what we're celebrating is not the election or swearing-in of a president. what we're doing is celebrating each other. and celebrating this incredible nation that we call home. and after we celebrate, let's mak
sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult. but america cannot resist this transition. we must lead it. we cannot seed to other nations the technology that will power new jobs and new industry, we must climbs it's promise. that's how we will maintain our economic vitality and our national treasure. a forrest in water ways, our crop land and snow cappedpeeks. that is how we will preserve our planet, command it to our god. that is what will lend meaning to the creed of fathers once declired. >> a lot of time spent on the issue of climate change in that speesh. was it a surprise to folks in the environmental community? >> i think they expected a shout out or mention along with immigration, gun control and tax issues. the environmental community was surprised as to how much mention it got. climate change got a huge chunk of time, almost more than any other policy issue and that was a real surprise to a lot of people. >> and an issue we didn't hear a lot about on the campaign trail, correct? >> that was definitely by design. over the last year the president's advisors have been
tie sod said it would be nice if the president focused on jobs and the energy crisis in the second term. >> jobs has not gotten lost. energy, the push too renewal energy, immigration reform starting off, of course, with the efforts to reduce gun violence in the country and climate change. climate change part of the renewal energy those are priorities for the president. i think in these first 18 months before people start saying, he is a lame duck. don't pay any attention to what he is doing. the first 18 months, we are going to see some action on those news. lois from new york. >> i am going to turn the phone down. i was listening to you. i was thinking about the things you thought president obama has done so well. i thought he was in my dreams? i just finished saying everything. i think he has done a great job on all of that. i remember, bill, when he first came to. i remember him signing the legislation into law where women could get equal pay for equal work. >> that was the first one, first one he signed. >> i remember when i was in college my
silicon energy in marysville are leading the world with some of the most durable solar cells ever built. janicki industries in sedro- wooley is driving innovation in aerospace. valve, a software company in bellevue has grown into a worldwide leader in interactive entertainment. and in grays harbor an across- the-board effort led to the re- opening of the paper mill last year, putting 175 people back to work making 100% recycled paper. i had this to say about washington. innovation is in our genes. [applause] we create. we invent. we build. so now we must go forward, with both high ambition and a recognition that the power of innovation will fuel the next wave of job growth in washington. make no mistake, our top priority today, tomorrow, and every day for the next four years, is jobs. we must build a working washington, capable of sustained economic leadership in a rapidly changing world. my plan focuses on job growth in seven industry clusters. aerospace, life sciences, military, agriculture, information technology, clean energy technology and the drivers of economic growth and job cre
reform, gun- control, and a balancing energy production with climate concerns. but his first priority is getting congress to increase the nation's debt ceiling at that talk about cutting the debt. that's where some think he will try to cement his legacy. >> he's going to try to get our long term in thailand obligations under control and set us on a new fiscal course. >> the president's first foreign-policy priority last term was israeli-palestinian peace. it's unlikely to take the top spot the second time, where most expect the president's focus to be on iran. >> it's hard to believe if we can't get a meaningful negotiation within the next two years that you will not have it read capable of producing a nuclear weapons. then, the u.s. has the choice in its negotiations -- will the solution be containment or is it going to be a preventive strike? >> as he takes the oath again, he will do it with the experience of that presidencies are often formed by crises that happened outside of their control. he will know all folksy brought here last i did not change washington. he will try somethin
today. i think all of us recognize that the energy has to come from the grassroots. that those of us who feel that the president needs to go further, and i think it barack obama were sitting here, he would say, yes, i like to go farther in terms of dealing with these issues of poverty and specific issues of the black community, but he would also say, you have to push me. that does not necessarily come from him deciding which are the greatest party as he has to deal with. just as johnson also said, look, i have a lot of priorities as president. if you love me to deal with is a voting rights issue, as king did in 1964 and 1965, you have to push me. king went out and helped stage the montgomery march along with lots of other people. that pushed johnson to act on the issue of voting rights. i think that we have to take on our responsibility as citizens to say, it is not enough to go to the polls every year and go. yes, when we go to the polls as african-americans, we are going to vote for barack obama as the better of the two candidates. but our responsibility than be caught -- then begins o
they'll use it for somewhat of an anefarious even atomic energy. is that a moral concern? >> i think so. i used to fly f-18 for the navy, flying it ten years ago was difficult because it was me talking to one other person on the radio making the decisions under stress over a target. today we have drones and other people on the ground and they are talking to each other. they are talking to the air traffic control plane in the sky. they are talking to people at the pentagon, for example, so we've got a lot more people talking in real-time. so i think drone warfare is say safer, more effective form of warfare. less collateral damage and press blue on blue kills which is when we kill our own people. >> jon: what about a death star? >> i signed that petition. >> jon: did you really? why didn't you sign that petition? [ laughter ] when you think about it if you say it's sort of an easier technology, is that the kind of thing where -- you know, i always -- listen, i watch a lot of movies. anything like the clone armies, drones -- all those types of things. you see 30 years from now there may b
. the purpose would be, he wrote, to embarrass the administration, to destroy the energy of the government and to substitute the pleasure, caprice or artifices, to the regular decisions of a respectable majority. that's just what the republicans have been doing. since 2007 when they lost the majority in the senate, they mounted or threatened to mount nearly 400 filibusters, blocking everything from equal pay to equal work, job bills and reform. as a result, there are more vacancies on the federal courts today than when president obama first took office. but hold on. when democrats were in the minority and threatening to filibuster against george w. bush's judicial nominees, their leader, harry reid, had some kind things to say about the tactic. >> the filibuster serves as a check on power and preserves our limited government. right now the only check on president bush is the democrats' ability to voice their concern in this body, the senate. if the republicans roll back our rights in this chamber, there will be no check on power. the radical right wing will be free to pursue anything they
becoming the bankrupting of our federal government. we, as conservatives, must dedicate our energies endeavors to growing america, to growing the american economy, to showing the younger generation how america can win the future. our task is not to grow government but to grow the middle class. if more government or the answer to our problems, our economy would be booming right now. you cannot hire enough government workers were given of taxpayer money to your taxes to allow green energy company to great prosperity. that path is a disaster. balancing the government books is not what matters most. government is not the and all and be all. the health of america is not about government at all. balancing the books as a nice goal but that is not our primary objective. our objective is to grow the private sector. need to focus our efforts and ideas to grow the american economy, not the government economy. i will talk about a couple of other points but if you take nothing else away from what i say, understand this -- we must not become the party of austerity. we must not be the party of aust
.s. putting its own fiscal house in order to be a leader on the world stage. kerry, a long-time clean energy advocate says it is a $6 trillion market worth millions of american jobs and we need to get in the game. >> the solution of climate change is energy policy. and the opportunities of energy policy so vastly outweigh the downsides that you are expressing concern about and i will spend a lot of time trying to persuade you and other colleagues. >> he was less committal about whether he would approve the keystone pipeline because it would cross the border between the u.s. and canada. kerry is expected to get a positive recommendation from the committee and if you will confirmation from the full senate next week. back with more bill press after the break. stay with us. alright, in 15 minutes we're going to do the young turks. i think the number one thing that viewers like about the young turks is that we're honest. they know that i'm not bs'ing them with some hidden agenda, actually supporting one party or the other. when the democrats are wrong, they know that i'
will do it in health care, education and energy. think about that. health care is one sixth of the economy. energy, you control the production and the pricing and control everything from he tried to with capt. trade and he tried. education is the future. you control those three elements and you have what lenin would call the commanding height of a post industrial society. that is what he said he wanted to do. in fact, you don't remember this because, unlike me, you have real lives for it you don't have to watch everything the man says. i do for my sins and they clearly are mending. [laughter] but he sprinkled that speech and the subsequent speeches until the georgetown speech with a phrase -- the new foundation, which was never picked up on and never remembered. but it was in there. in fact, the name of the speech was called "the new foundation." he already saw himself one month into the presidency as a successor to the new deal and the new frontier. he wanted this appellation, the new foundation, to be what obama is and would be. so it shows you how ideologically ambitious he was from day
a pro. barrow island has got rare kangaroos. ♪ chevron has been developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ >>> outgoing secretary of state hillary clinton and president barack obama sat down to dawk with "60 minutes tonight." he had plenty of nice things to say, but it wasn't so long ago they were like this. >> while i was working on the streets you were certificating on the board of walmart. >> you were representing resco in innercity chicago. >> my how things have changed. tonight on cbs they address the tragedy in benghazi, libya this past november. >> i knew chris stevens, i sent him there originally. it was a great personal loss to lose him and three other brave americans. i also have looked back and try to figure out what we can do so that nobody in so far as possible will be in this position again. we also live in a dangerous world. the people i'm p
to committing all of my energies to working with the other commissioners and extremely talented and dedicated men and women of the staff of the sec, to fulfill the agencies mission to protect investors and ensure the strength, efficiency, and transparency of our capital markets. the sec, long a vital and positive force for our markets, has a lot of hard and important work ahead of it. i would welcome the opportunity to lead those efforts and build on the work of chairman mary schapiro and chairman elisse walter, who i am very honored is present today. finally and most importantly, i want to thank my husband, who is here today on what is our 43rd wedding anniversary -- >> today? >> today -- for his strong support of me in seeking to engage this public service. thank you very much. >> thank you. richard. >> thank you, mr. president, for the confidence you have placed in me and the team at the consumer financial protection bureau. we understand that our mission is to stand on the side of consumers -- our mothers and fathers, sisters and brothers, sons and daughters -- and see that they are treat
was just looking at the ceiling hoping my president would call. that's the kind of energy you have to put in. >> martin what about the republicans? let's talk about our party right now. you look at the numbers, not good. the president, the 52% approval rating. john boehner has an 18% approval rating. we are a party that seems to be shrinking. how do we reverse that trend? >> well you spend enough time in the desert you find water. you lose enough you begin to sort of get some sanity. i think there's been some moves over the last couple of weeks that show that we're making some progress on this last budget deal looking forward. i think there's some progress. i think republicans are starting to show movement. we're making progress on the immigration front. i think there's something to be optimistic about. >> all right. let's try and be optimistic david gregory, while also being realistic. looking ahead to the next four years which really is the next two years, if you considered midterms, where it all potentially ends and the president's ability to get something d
to school. nathan. tadpole. and help ensure a constant supply of clean energy. the things we build share one belief. that the world's biggest challenges deserve even bigger solutions. powerful answers. verizon. for their "destination wedding." double miles you can "actually" use. but with those single mile travel cards... [ bridesmaid ] blacked out... but i'm a bridesmaid. oh! "x" marks the spot she'll never sit. but i bought a dress! a toast... ...to the capital one venture card. fly any airline, any flight, anytime. double miles you can actually use. what a coincidence? what's in your wallet? [ all screaming ] watch the elbows ladies. nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was just looking for my stapler and my... this thing. i save money by using fedex ground and buy my own supplies. that's a great idea. i'm going to go... we got clients in today. [ male announcer ] save on ground shipping at fedex office. >> a facebook ad and the supreme court justice's hat topping our media moments. first, greg abbott posting an invitation to new york gu
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 161 (some duplicates have been removed)

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